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Articles Posted in OSHA Regulations

A construction siteAccording to a survey released in November of last year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that were over 2.8 million nonfatal workplace injuries in 2018. The good news is that this number is the same as in 2017, and the annual number of workplace injuries has been in decline over the last several years. However, 2.8 million is still a lot of injuries. More importantly, the total number of injuries doesn’t matter if you’re the one who is injured and unable to work. 

Why OSHA Standards Are Important

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is charged with promulgating laws and regulations designed to keep our workforce safe. Unfortunately, many employers put their workers at risk by failing to keep up with OSHA standards or intentionally choosing to put profits over their employee’s safety. While OSHA standards cannot prevent every accident, the protections and training that they mandate are important. Failing to comply with OSHA standards can often lead to an accident and serious injury. 

A knocked-over "caution - cleaning in progress" signWorkplace injuries are more common than you may think. In a news release issued earlier this month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that there were 2.8 million nonfatal workplace injuries in 2017. Of those injuries, almost 890,000 required the employee to miss work.  

For many of us, missing work means lost income. The situation gets even more complicated if your injury leaves you partially or totally disabled, even if the disability is only temporary. And unfortunately, many of these injuries are preventable. As a result of ever-increasing pressures to be profitable, many employers become careless with regard to their employees’ safety. Using statistics from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), we’ll review some of the ways that employers routinely put the safety of their employees at risk.  

  • Inadequate fall protection and training. Employers can violate OSHA regulations by failing to install guardrails, provide safety harnesses, or take other measures to guard against falls. OSHA also mandates that employers provide sufficient training to employees in order to help them avoid fall hazards.
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